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Covid-19 information updates

From 20 January: Face coverings will no longer be advised for staff and pupils in secondary school and college classrooms.

From 27 January: Face coverings will no longer be advised for staff and pupils in communal areas of secondary schools, nor for staff in communal areas of primaries. Directors of Public Health will only be able to recommend pupils and staff wear masks in communal areas in places where there are outbreaks or where the local public health situation justifies it, and with sign-off from the Education Secretary.

From 27 January: There is no longer a legal requirement to wear a face covering. The government suggests that you continue to wear a face covering in crowded and enclosed spaces where you may come into contact with other people you do not normally meet.

From 27 January: Venues and events will no longer be required by law to check visitors’ NHS COVID Pass. Some venues may still choose to run the NHS COVID PASS voluntarily and request it.

From today (20 Jan) the government is no longer asking people to work from home. People should speak to their employers about arrangements for returning to the office. School children no longer need to wear face masks in the classroom.

From Thursday 27 January:

  • Venues and events will no longer be required by law to use the NHS Covid Pass. The NHS Covid Pass can still be used on a voluntary basis as was previously the case in Plan A.
  • Face coverings are no longer required by law in any setting. Public health guidance will remain in place, suggesting individuals should continue to wear a face covering in crowded and enclosed spaces, where you may come into contact with people you do not normally meet.

Businesses should continue following Working Safely guidance, which will be updated in light of these changes. 

Vaccination remains the best defence against Covid-19, and anyone who has not yet received a vaccination or booster is urged to book one now.

Myths and Reality
Myth: People need to have an NHS number to get a vaccine.
-You do not need an NHS number or GP registration to get vaccinated. People can use a walk-in vaccinations centre or ask to book COVID-19 vaccination appointments as an unregistered patient through a local GP practice. 
Myth: You can’t get a vaccine if you are in the UK illegally.
Overseas visitors to England, including anyone living in the UK without permission, can be tested, treated or vaccinated for
COVID-19 for free

Travel restrictions

Travel abroad from England during coronavirus (COVID-19)
Travel restrictions: check the testing and quarantine rules when you travel abroad from England.

Isolation rules for people with COVID-19

From Monday, 17 January instead of the current rules allowing people to leave self-isolation after seven days, with a negative test on days six and seven, people will be able to leave self isolation at the start of day six if they have negative tests on day five and six.

Pregnant women encouraged to get Vaccinated

Pregnant Women are encouraged to get vaccinated. The COVID-19 vaccines are safe for pregnant women and have no impact on fertility.

Don’t take COVID-19 back to campus. Take a rapid COVID-19 test before you return to university.

 

The Prime Minister has announced a huge ramping up of the COVID-19 booster
vaccination programme

Book your booster now. A booster jab gives over 70% protection from the new variant. The Omicron COVID-19 variant is spreading fast.

COVID-19 booster vaccines

Millions of the UK’s most vulnerable are to be offered a COVID-19 booster vaccine from next week.
Click for more information

COVID-19 vaccine

Winter Vaccines Explained – with Dr Amir Khan, Dr Dawn Harper and Dr Karan Ranj
13 million people have now had life-saving booster jabs. If you are eligible, get your booster jab as soon as you can. Follow all safer behaviours to keep COVID-19 from spreading.
A well ventilated room can reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection by 70%. Follow all safer behaviours to keep COVID-19 from spreading. If you are eligible, get your booster jab as soon as you can
Vaccines | Q&A with Dr Nighat Arif on vaccine and immunosuppression

“12-15s” year olds can now receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Please watch video below which contains more relevant information related to “12-15s year old Covid-19 vaccine including, parents consent, invitation, safety, family, wellbeing, protection, efficacy etc.

  • Younger people are at risk from COVID-19 and can pass on the illness to loved ones such as family and friends

  • Vaccines prevent serious illness, deaths and hospital admissions.

  • Encourage young people in your communities to have a jab

  • Walk in centres are now available for younger people to get their free vaccine.